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'release-1_4_1'.

git-svn-id: svn://svn.code.sf.net/p/stella/code/tags/release-1_4_1@342 8b62c5a3-ac7e-4cc8-8f21-d9a121418aba
parent 0430cd0f
# The "checkoutlist" file is used to support additional version controlled
# administrative files in $CVSROOT/CVSROOT, such as template files.
#
# The first entry on a line is a filename which will be checked out from
# the corresponding RCS file in the $CVSROOT/CVSROOT directory.
# The remainder of the line is an error message to use if the file cannot
# be checked out.
#
# File format:
#
# [<whitespace>]<filename><whitespace><error message><end-of-line>
#
# comment lines begin with '#'
syncmail Couldn't check out syncmail script.
# The "commitinfo" file is used to control pre-commit checks.
# The filter on the right is invoked with the repository and a list
# of files to check. A non-zero exit of the filter program will
# cause the commit to be aborted.
#
# The first entry on a line is a regular expression which is tested
# against the directory that the change is being committed to, relative
# to the $CVSROOT. For the first match that is found, then the remainder
# of the line is the name of the filter to run.
#
# If the repository name does not match any of the regular expressions in this
# file, the "DEFAULT" line is used, if it is specified.
#
# If the name "ALL" appears as a regular expression it is always used
# in addition to the first matching regex or "DEFAULT".
# Set this to "no" if pserver shouldn't check system users/passwords
#SystemAuth=no
# Set `PreservePermissions' to `yes' to save file status information
# in the repository.
#PreservePermissions=no
# Set `TopLevelAdmin' to `yes' to create a CVS directory at the top
# level of the new working directory when using the `cvs checkout'
# command.
#TopLevelAdmin=no
# This file affects handling of files based on their names.
#
# The -t/-f options allow one to treat directories of files
# as a single file, or to transform a file in other ways on
# its way in and out of CVS.
#
# The -m option specifies whether CVS attempts to merge files.
#
# The -k option specifies keyword expansion (e.g. -kb for binary).
#
# Format of wrapper file ($CVSROOT/CVSROOT/cvswrappers or .cvswrappers)
#
# wildcard [option value][option value]...
#
# where option is one of
# -f from cvs filter value: path to filter
# -t to cvs filter value: path to filter
# -m update methodology value: MERGE or COPY
# -k expansion mode value: b, o, kkv, &c
#
# and value is a single-quote delimited value.
# For example:
#*.gif -k 'b'
# The "editinfo" file is used to allow verification of logging
# information. It works best when a template (as specified in the
# rcsinfo file) is provided for the logging procedure. Given a
# template with locations for, a bug-id number, a list of people who
# reviewed the code before it can be checked in, and an external
# process to catalog the differences that were code reviewed, the
# following test can be applied to the code:
#
# Making sure that the entered bug-id number is correct.
# Validating that the code that was reviewed is indeed the code being
# checked in (using the bug-id number or a seperate review
# number to identify this particular code set.).
#
# If any of the above test failed, then the commit would be aborted.
#
# Actions such as mailing a copy of the report to each reviewer are
# better handled by an entry in the loginfo file.
#
# One thing that should be noted is the the ALL keyword is not
# supported. There can be only one entry that matches a given
# repository.
# The "loginfo" file controls where "cvs commit" log information
# is sent. The first entry on a line is a regular expression which must match
# the directory that the change is being made to, relative to the
# $CVSROOT. If a match is found, then the remainder of the line is a filter
# program that should expect log information on its standard input.
#
# If the repository name does not match any of the regular expressions in this
# file, the "DEFAULT" line is used, if it is specified.
#
# If the name ALL appears as a regular expression it is always used
# in addition to the first matching regex or DEFAULT.
#
# You may specify a format string as part of the
# filter. The string is composed of a `%' followed
# by a single format character, or followed by a set of format
# characters surrounded by `{' and `}' as separators. The format
# characters are:
#
# s = file name
# V = old version number (pre-checkin)
# v = new version number (post-checkin)
#
# For example:
#DEFAULT (echo ""; id; echo %s; date; cat) >> $CVSROOT/CVSROOT/commitlog
# or
#DEFAULT (echo ""; id; echo %{sVv}; date; cat) >> $CVSROOT/CVSROOT/commitlog
CVSROOT $CVSROOT/CVSROOT/syncmail %{sVv} bwmott@acm.org
DEFAULT $CVSROOT/CVSROOT/syncmail %{sVv} stella-commits@lists.sourceforge.net
# Three different line formats are valid:
# key -a aliases...
# key [options] directory
# key [options] directory files...
#
# Where "options" are composed of:
# -i prog Run "prog" on "cvs commit" from top-level of module.
# -o prog Run "prog" on "cvs checkout" of module.
# -e prog Run "prog" on "cvs export" of module.
# -t prog Run "prog" on "cvs rtag" of module.
# -u prog Run "prog" on "cvs update" of module.
# -d dir Place module in directory "dir" instead of module name.
# -l Top-level directory only -- do not recurse.
#
# NOTE: If you change any of the "Run" options above, you'll have to
# release and re-checkout any working directories of these modules.
#
# And "directory" is a path to a directory relative to $CVSROOT.
#
# The "-a" option specifies an alias. An alias is interpreted as if
# everything on the right of the "-a" had been typed on the command line.
#
# You can encode a module within a module by using the special '&'
# character to interpose another module into the current module. This
# can be useful for creating a module that consists of many directories
# spread out over the entire source repository.
# The "notify" file controls where notifications from watches set by
# "cvs watch add" or "cvs edit" are sent. The first entry on a line is
# a regular expression which is tested against the directory that the
# change is being made to, relative to the $CVSROOT. If it matches,
# then the remainder of the line is a filter program that should contain
# one occurrence of %s for the user to notify, and information on its
# standard input.
#
# "ALL" or "DEFAULT" can be used in place of the regular expression.
#
# For example:
#ALL mail %s -s "CVS notification"
# The "rcsinfo" file is used to control templates with which the editor
# is invoked on commit and import.
#
# The first entry on a line is a regular expression which is tested
# against the directory that the change is being made to, relative to the
# $CVSROOT. For the first match that is found, then the remainder of the
# line is the name of the file that contains the template.
#
# If the repository name does not match any of the regular expressions in this
# file, the "DEFAULT" line is used, if it is specified.
#
# If the name "ALL" appears as a regular expression it is always used
# in addition to the first matching regex or "DEFAULT".
#! /usr/bin/python
# -*- Python -*-
"""Complicated notification for CVS checkins.
This script is used to provide email notifications of changes to the CVS
repository. These email changes will include context diffs of the changes.
Really big diffs will be trimmed.
This script is run from a CVS loginfo file (see $CVSROOT/CVSROOT/loginfo). To
set this up, create a loginfo entry that looks something like this:
mymodule /path/to/this/script %%s some-email-addr@your.domain
In this example, whenever a checkin that matches `mymodule' is made, this
script is invoked, which will generate the diff containing email, and send it
to some-email-addr@your.domain.
Note: This module used to also do repository synchronizations via
rsync-over-ssh, but since the repository has been moved to SourceForge,
this is no longer necessary. The syncing functionality has been ripped
out in the 3.0, which simplifies it considerably. Access the 2.x versions
to refer to this functionality. Because of this, the script is misnamed.
It no longer makes sense to run this script from the command line. Doing so
will only print out this usage information.
Usage:
%(PROGRAM)s [options] <%%S> email-addr [email-addr ...]
Where options is:
--cvsroot=<path>
Use <path> as the environment variable CVSROOT. Otherwise this
variable must exist in the environment.
--help
-h
Print this text.
--context=#
-C #
Include # lines of context around lines that differ (default: 2).
-c
Produce a context diff (default).
-u
Produce a unified diff (smaller, but harder to read).
<%%S>
CVS %%s loginfo expansion. When invoked by CVS, this will be a single
string containing the directory the checkin is being made in, relative
to $CVSROOT, followed by the list of files that are changing. If the
%%s in the loginfo file is %%{sVv}, context diffs for each of the
modified files are included in any email messages that are generated.
email-addrs
At least one email address.
"""
import os
import sys
import string
import time
import getopt
# Notification command
MAILCMD = '/bin/mail -s "CVS: %(SUBJECT)s" %(PEOPLE)s 2>&1 > /dev/null'
# Diff trimming stuff
DIFF_HEAD_LINES = 20
DIFF_TAIL_LINES = 20
DIFF_TRUNCATE_IF_LARGER = 1000
PROGRAM = sys.argv[0]
def usage(code, msg=''):
print __doc__ % globals()
if msg:
print msg
sys.exit(code)
def calculate_diff(filespec, contextlines):
try:
file, oldrev, newrev = string.split(filespec, ',')
except ValueError:
# No diff to report
return '***** Bogus filespec: %s' % filespec
if oldrev == 'NONE':
try:
if os.path.exists(file):
fp = open(file)
else:
update_cmd = 'cvs -fn update -r %s -p %s' % (newrev, file)
fp = os.popen(update_cmd)
lines = fp.readlines()
fp.close()
lines.insert(0, '--- NEW FILE: %s ---\n' % file)
except IOError, e:
lines = ['***** Error reading new file: ',
str(e), '\n***** file: ', file, ' cwd: ', os.getcwd()]
elif newrev == 'NONE':
lines = ['--- %s DELETED ---\n' % file]
else:
# This /has/ to happen in the background, otherwise we'll run into CVS
# lock contention. What a crock.
if contextlines > 0:
difftype = "-C " + str(contextlines)
else:
difftype = "-u"
diffcmd = "/usr/bin/cvs -f diff -kk %s --minimal -r %s -r %s '%s'" % (
difftype, oldrev, newrev, file)
fp = os.popen(diffcmd)
lines = fp.readlines()
sts = fp.close()
# ignore the error code, it always seems to be 1 :(
## if sts:
## return 'Error code %d occurred during diff\n' % (sts >> 8)
if len(lines) > DIFF_TRUNCATE_IF_LARGER:
removedlines = len(lines) - DIFF_HEAD_LINES - DIFF_TAIL_LINES
del lines[DIFF_HEAD_LINES:-DIFF_TAIL_LINES]
lines.insert(DIFF_HEAD_LINES,
'[...%d lines suppressed...]\n' % removedlines)
return string.join(lines, '')
def blast_mail(mailcmd, filestodiff, contextlines):
# cannot wait for child process or that will cause parent to retain cvs
# lock for too long. Urg!
if not os.fork():
# in the child
# give up the lock you cvs thang!
time.sleep(2)
fp = os.popen(mailcmd, 'w')
fp.write(sys.stdin.read())
fp.write('\n')
# append the diffs if available
for file in filestodiff:
fp.write(calculate_diff(file, contextlines))
fp.write('\n')
fp.close()
# doesn't matter what code we return, it isn't waited on
os._exit(0)
# scan args for options
def main():
contextlines = 2
try:
opts, args = getopt.getopt(sys.argv[1:], 'hC:cu',
['context=', 'cvsroot=', 'help'])
except getopt.error, msg:
usage(1, msg)
# parse the options
for opt, arg in opts:
if opt in ('-h', '--help'):
usage(0)
elif opt == '--cvsroot':
os.environ['CVSROOT'] = arg
elif opt in ('-C', '--context'):
contextlines = int(arg)
elif opt == '-c':
if contextlines <= 0:
contextlines = 2
elif opt == '-u':
contextlines = 0
# What follows is the specification containing the files that were
# modified. The argument actually must be split, with the first component
# containing the directory the checkin is being made in, relative to
# $CVSROOT, followed by the list of files that are changing.
if not args:
usage(1, 'No CVS module specified')
SUBJECT = args[0]
specs = string.split(args[0])
del args[0]
# The remaining args should be the email addresses
if not args:
usage(1, 'No recipients specified')
# Now do the mail command
PEOPLE = string.join(args)
mailcmd = MAILCMD % vars()
print 'Mailing %s...' % PEOPLE
if specs == ['-', 'Imported', 'sources']:
return
if specs[-3:] == ['-', 'New', 'directory']:
del specs[-3:]
elif len(specs) > 2:
L = specs[:2]
for s in specs[2:]:
prev = L[-1]
if string.count(prev, ",") < 2:
L[-1] = "%s %s" % (prev, s)
else:
L.append(s)
specs = L
print 'Generating notification message...'
blast_mail(mailcmd, specs[1:], contextlines)
print 'Generating notification message... done.'
if __name__ == '__main__':
main()
sys.exit(0)
# The "taginfo" file is used to control pre-tag checks.
# The filter on the right is invoked with the following arguments:
#
# $1 -- tagname
# $2 -- operation "add" for tag, "mov" for tag -F, and "del" for tag -d
# $3 -- repository
# $4-> file revision [file revision ...]
#
# A non-zero exit of the filter program will cause the tag to be aborted.
#
# The first entry on a line is a regular expression which is tested
# against the directory that the change is being committed to, relative
# to the $CVSROOT. For the first match that is found, then the remainder
# of the line is the name of the filter to run.
#
# If the repository name does not match any of the regular expressions in this
# file, the "DEFAULT" line is used, if it is specified.
#
# If the name "ALL" appears as a regular expression it is always used
# in addition to the first matching regex or "DEFAULT".
# The "verifymsg" file is used to allow verification of logging
# information. It works best when a template (as specified in the
# rcsinfo file) is provided for the logging procedure. Given a
# template with locations for, a bug-id number, a list of people who
# reviewed the code before it can be checked in, and an external
# process to catalog the differences that were code reviewed, the
# following test can be applied to the code:
#
# Making sure that the entered bug-id number is correct.
# Validating that the code that was reviewed is indeed the code being
# checked in (using the bug-id number or a seperate review
# number to identify this particular code set.).
#
# If any of the above test failed, then the commit would be aborted.
#
# Actions such as mailing a copy of the report to each reviewer are
# better handled by an entry in the loginfo file.
#
# One thing that should be noted is the the ALL keyword is not
# supported. There can be only one entry that matches a given
# repository.
<html>
<head>
<title>Stella - A multi-platform Atari 2600 VCS emulator</title>
<meta name="AppleTitle" content="docs">
</head>
<body bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
<center><b><font size="7">Stella</font></b></center>
<br><br>
<center><h2><b>A multi-platform Atari 2600 VCS emulator</b></h2></center>
<center><h4><b>Release 1.4.1</b></h4></center>
<br><br>
<center><h2><b>User's Guide</b></h2></center>
<br><br>
<ol>
<li><a href="#Introduction">Introduction</a></li>
<li><a href="#Requirements">What You Will Need</a></li>
<li><a href="#Installation">Installation</a></li>
<li><a href="#Games">Games</a></li>
<li><a href="#Starting">Starting A Game</a></li>
<li><a href="#Settings">Settings File</a></li>
<li><a href="#Keyboard">Keyboard Layout</a></li>
<li><a href="#Remapping">Event Remapping</a></li>
<li><a href="#Properties">Game Properties</a></li>
<li><a href="#Adaptor">Stelladaptor Support</a></li>
<li><a href="#Acknowledgments">Acknowledgments</a></li>
<li><a href="#License">License and Disclaimer</a></li>
</ol>
<br><br><br>
<center><b>February 1999 - August 2004</b></center>
<center><b>The Stella Team</b></center>
<center><b><a href="http://stella.sourceforge.net">Stella Homepage</a></b></center>
<br><br><br>
<br><br>
<h1><b>A Brief History of the Atari 2600</b></h1>
<hr>
<p><a><img src="graphics/console.png" ALIGN=RIGHT></a>
In the early 1970's, video arcade games gained commercial success for the
first time. The American public was introduced to Pong, Tank, and other
interactive video games which populated amusement parks, bars, and arcades.
The games were successful enough to create interest for home versions, so in
1975 Atari released Home Pong and it was a smash hit. Other companies such as
Magnavox and Coleco followed suit and released their own dedicated console
games. Then in 1976, Fairchild Camera and Instrument introduced the Channel F
system, the first cartridge based home video game system. The industry
recognized that cartridge systems were the future of video gaming, and began
development in that direction. In January 1977, RCA released the Studio II,
another cartridge based system, although it only projected in black and white
and seemed to be focused on educational titles. Then, in October 1977, Atari
released the Atari VCS (Video Computer System) with an initial offering of nine
games. This system, later renamed the Atari 2600, took the industry by storm
and dominated the marketplace for years to come.
</p>
<p><a><img src="graphics/chucky_cheese.png" ALIGN=LEFT></a>
Because of oversupply, the Christmas season of 1977 was very rough on the
video game industry, and the Atari 2600 was the only system that managed to
emerge unscathed. Atari enjoyed strong sales in 1978 and a fantastic holiday
season, as Atari released more games such as Outlaw, Spacewar, and Breakout.
Internally however, Atari was at odds. Nolan Bushnell, the inventor of pong and
founder of Atari, wound up leaving the company and purchased Pizza Time Theater,
which later became the successful Chuck E. Cheese! In 1979 Atari continued
their trend and released 12 more games which met with continued success.
However, Atari was now facing some stiffer competition from the Mattel
Intellivision and the Magnavox Odyssey2.
</p>
<p><a><img src="graphics/space_invaders.png" ALIGN=RIGHT></a>
Atari needed a mega-hit in 1980 in order to squash the competition, and they
found it in the home version of a game from Japan called Space Invaders. It was
so popular that people were buying the Atari 2600 just so they could play Space
Invaders at home. Following that, Atari released Adventure, which was the first
video game to contain an Easter Egg - placing an object in a certain area
revealed the programmer's name, Warren Robinett. 1980 was important for another
reason - the creation of the first ever third party software producer, Activision.
The company was formed by four Atari employees who were unsatisfied with the
working conditions at the company. They released four games initially: Dragster,
Fishing Derby, Checkers and Boxing. The games were very well received by the
public, and revealed that the Atari 2600 was capable of better games than
Atari themselves had been producing. Atari tried to prevent Activision from
selling games, but they failed and Activision grossed $70 million that year.
</p>
<p>
By 1981, the video game industry was basically a horse race between the 2600
and the Intellivision. While the Intellivision was technologically superior in
some respects, the 2600 continued to lead in sales. Atari released the home
version of Asteroids, which was a huge success. Inspired by the success of
Activision, another software development group called Imagic was formed. They
would not release any games until 1982 however. Another company, Games by Apollo,
was formed in Texas and released several games that year.
</p>
<p>
Coleco entered the market in 1982 with the release of the graphically
superior Colecovision. To combat this new system, Atari produced the 5200,
a technologically comparable system. The 2600 dropped $100 in price in order
to remain competitive. Then a company called Arcadia released a peripheral
called the Supercharger which played games in an audio cassette medium. This
allowed for multiple loads and expanded the 2600's capabilities.
<p><a><img src="graphics/pacman.png" ALIGN=LEFT></a>
Atari released Pac-Man and E.T. that year, two incredibly hyped games which
were critical flops.
Although Pac-Man sold many copies, it was considered to be a poor
translation of the arcade hit. However, there were many fantastic games
produced for the 2600 during this period, and it was still selling strong.
</p>
<p>
Ever since the inception of Activision, Atari had been fighting to keep third
parties from producing cartridges which they felt were stealing profits from
them. Finally the issue was settled when Atari agreed to allow third party
manufacturing in exchange for a royalty. Suddenly software companies began
popping up all over, and 1982 saw releases from companies like Venturevision,
Spectravision, Telesys, CBS, 20th Century Fox, US Games, M Network, Tigervision,
Data Age, Imagic and Coleco. There was even a company that released a line of
X-Rated games for the 2600 called Mystique. The year was financially successful
for Atari, however there seemed to be a glut of software. Although there were
many quality titles still produced, there was an increasing number of rushed
games as manufacturers attempted to cash in on the craze.
</p>
<p>
More companies jumped on the band wagon in 1983. Zimag, Ultravision, Amiga,
and others were also producing games and peripherals. It seemed as if there was
just too much product to meet the demand, and as it turned out there was. By
the end of the year, companies began folding. US Games, Data Age, Games by
Apollo, Telesys and others all closed their doors from poor sales. A video
game crash was occurring, and all companies were taking it on the chin.
</p>
<p>
1984 was a much more subdued year for the Atari 2600, and the price of the
system had now dropped to $40-$50. Many were saying that the video game
industry was dead. However, Atari surprised everyone by announcing the release
of the 7800, and also promising more 2600 games with improved graphics and
sound. Unfortunately, neither of these things happened in 1984 because Atari
sold their home video game division to Jack Tramiel who believed that home
computers would replace video game systems. No further mention of the 2600 or
7800 was made that year, and it appeared that they might be dead.
</p>
<p>
1985 was another very quiet year for Atari and video games in general, and only
a few games were released for the 2600. Activision produced Cosmic Commuter and
Ghostbusters, but with little fanfare or marketing, these games did not sell
well. However, because of the huge game library and cheap price, Atari still
sold over a million 2600 consoles in 1985.
</p>
<p>
There were very few plans for home video game systems by any company in 1986,
since the market appeared to be dead. Then, to most people's surprise, Nintendo
brought the NES to America and it was a smash hit, proving that video games
still had a place in the US. Atari decided that maybe it would be a good idea
to release the 7800 units it had in storage, and produce some more 2600 games.
The 7800 was released with only 3 games initially available, although it was
compatible with the 2600 library. They also redesigned the 2600 as the 2600 Jr.,
a machine with the same abilities, but a new look and marketing campaign. It
was sold for less than $50.
</p>
<p><a><img src="graphics/jr_pacman.png" ALIGN=RIGHT></a>
Video games were once again selling phenomenally in 1987. Atari released
several new titles, including Jr. Pac-Man, and also licensed a number of games
from other companies such as Donkey Kong and Q*Bert. These new titles sold for
$10-$15. Interestingly, a number of titles began appearing again from third
part companies such as Epyx, Froggo, and Exus. It seemed that the 2600 was not
dead yet!
<p><a><img src="graphics/secret_quest.png" ALIGN=LEFT></a>
In 1988, Atari rehired Nolan Bushnell and announced a number of new
titles, including Secret Quest, a game written by Mr. Bushnell himself. Atari
continued to manufacture these games even until 1989. However, it was apparent
that the 2600, after its introduction over a decade ago, was finally at the end
of its run. Although it was still produced and marketed outside of the US, the
Atari 2600 finished its run in America. No other console has had such a long
history or sold as many systems in the U.S.
</p>
<p>
Today, the 2600 still has a large number of fans who remember the countless
games played over the years, and the years to come. There are even games being
produced by hobbyists, some of them quite professionally, being released on
newly burnt cartridges with labels and manuals. And the recent trend in
retrogaming has brought many more video game fans to rediscover the 2600, and
it continues to live on 22 years after its release!
</p>